Yom Kippur War veteran fighter planes

1/72 Mirage V, Mirage IIIB, Mirage IIIC, MiG-21MF & Super Mystere

by Yoav Efrati

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     The photos in this article show Yom Kippur War Israeli Air Force veteran fighter planes including: (IAI built Mirage V) Nesher 565 of the First Fighter squadron with 7.5 kills, Mirage IIIB no.286 of the First Jet squadron with 4.5 kills, Mirage IIIC no.458 of the First Fighter squadron converted to recon configuration with 13 kills and Saar no.096 of the Scorpion squadron in an air to ground configuration. For the sake of contrast, an Egyptian MiG-21MF in 1973 war colors is also provided.

     The use of yellow and black identification triangles/trapeze on IAF fighters began in the middle of the October 1973 war when Libyan Mirage 5 fighters began attacking IDF forces in the Sinai.     

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      During the 1973 war, IAF airplanes were given a two digit tail number and if there were more than 100 airplanes of the same type in service ( i.e. A-4 Skyhawk) there were given a third number, usually by the squadron. After the war, a three digit number was introduced, where the first digit of the number was used to designate the type of airplane. For example, the most numerous "Delta Fighters" were given 1- Mirage IIIC, 2-Mirage IIIB, 4-Recon Delta fighters, 5-Single seat Neshers, 6-Two seat Neshers, 7-Kfir.

     The models shown are all in 1/72 scale. The Nesher is Heller's Mirage IIIE/V with a PJ resin nose section.  The Mirage IIIB is PJ productions recently released all resin Mirage IIIB kit.  The Mirage IIIC recon nose is AML's recently issued kit.  Saar 096 is Airfix Super Mystere converted to the Saar using an extended exhaust section from an A-4.  The MiG-21MF is KP's old kit with a resin ejection seat and scratch built interior.

     For markings I used IsraDecal sheets for the Super Mysteres and Mirages and for the MiG-21 I used HQD decal sheet made for Arab MiG-21's.

Yours,

Yoav

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Photos and text by Yoav Efrati